For the Love of Learning: Our Favorite Industry Books

Our relationship to plenty of things can seem fickle. There’s always a hot new social network, restaurant or other distraction to occupy our time. The world of industry books operates in much the same way. Each year, there’s a new “must have” book offering the streamline your life and revolutionize your career. In that overwhelming and ever-changing chaos, there are some industry books that we think have stood the test of time.
Happiness is a good book.

Happiness is a good book.

Here are the ones we return to over and over again: What Got You Here Won’t Get You There Ever felt like you’ve hit a plateau in your career? (It’s OK – we all have at one point or another.) While it may be easy to blame a “chilling out” period on stress, burn out or some other factor, Marshall Goldsmith encourages readers to take a look inward at their personal Achilles heel. This book operates on the basic premise that there are a handful of workplace habits that often keep successful people from making the next big leap forward in their career. Goldsmith seeks to help you identify those habits and overcome them so you can make that you can keep moving forward in your professional life. We refer to this book frequently when we facilitate professionalism workshops and have taken the advice to heart  in evaluation our own hang-ups and performance levels. Talk, Inc. “Leaders should generate trust in their followers.” Well, sure, but HOW? Talk, Inc. provides plainly spoken, well-written advice from a number of cultures and industries to elucidate how great leaders use face-to-face communications to generate conversations about their organizations. By talking and listening, organizations that embrace open-ended conversations are able to build the trust needed to thrive. Associated Press Stylebook This is it. This is the big daddy of all communications publications. The book that you loathed in college and now consult on a near-daily basis. The book that taught you beyond a shadow of a doubt that the “i” in “Internet” should be capitalized. Well, that’s actually the one rule we tend to ignore. But overall, it’s our go-to source to keep us from embarrassing ourselves when we land in a journalist’s inbox. Following AP style is the PR person’s credibility badge. This book is a classic, and one that in our industry, you just can’t afford to live without. Presentation Zen When it was published, Presentation Zen broke through a seemingly invisible constitution that declared all PowerPoint presentations must be terrible.  The book reminds presenters that PowerPoint is a tool to support your words and connection with the audience—not the message itself. Combining design principles with the tenets of Zen simplicity, this book will help you along the path to simpler, more effective presentations. What book has pushed you forward in your career? Let us know in the comments!

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